Tag Archives: Rocket Science

Commence Docking Procedures!

In a little under two hours, if all goes well, there will be a rocket launch to the ISS via Space X (you can catch NASA’s live feed here).

If you want to wile away a couple hours, you can get good at docking the Dragon capsule with the ISS in a simulator using similar controls to what the astronauts are about to use.

Be warned though, it takes patience and precision. But as gastronaut Alton Brown would say, “Your patience will be rewarded.”

(by the way, thanks to a friend far more skilled and speedy at docking, do a 180 from the station for an Easter egg).

Space is big. Really, really big.

I saw Ad Astra this past weekend, which is doing its part to make sci-fi hard like vibranium not squishy like flubber

NASA is very clear on the whole “Space is big” thing.

Scientist James O’Donoghue decided to make an animation to demonstrate how “warp speeds” worked in Star Trek, its various incarnations known for loving science… while certainly not being beholden to rigidly adhering to known norms because writers.

In any case, even though vast distances can be crossed in three days or three weeks “at maximum warp” based the needs of the episode, official unofficial definitions of how faster than the speed of light Star Trek‘s warp speeds have been documented. So, Warp 9.9 –basically the point where Scotty would presumably tell Kirk in no uncertain terms that the Enterprise is about to fly apart– is 2,083 times the speed of light. That’s fast.

But space is big. Really, really big. So fast is, wait for it, relative.

So I don’t agree with the headline that warp speed is “achingly slow” –I mean I’d like to get to the next star system in the same time it take us to get to the other side of the planet– it only goes so far, so fast.

And for something completely different: NASA’s Moon Base plans

I was going to do a longer post about fandom gatekeeping and tie it into Banned Book Week, but I don’t have time, so here’s an article from TechRadar about NASA’s current plans for how we humans may use the moon to aid further exploration of the solar system.