Tag Archives: Learning

Video

Get Some Writing Inspiration

Last weekend… I did a bunch of chores. But I also did said chores while watching multiple panels and some breakout sessions for the Online Writer’s Conference I talked about last week.

If you missed it, good news! You can check out the panels from both days on the same website.

Day One
Day Two

Combined, it’s over 13 hours worth of insights and techniques from working novelists, screenwriters, and others.

So check it out! Perhaps while you’re taking care of a bunch of chores. I’m going to do that because I’m sure I missed a few things. Whatever works!

Online Writing Conference this Weekend!

The coronavirus pandemic has halted an ever-increasing number of conventions, conferences, and in-person workshops.

Russell Nohelty and Nicolas Nelson are lamenting this state of affairs, so they’ve organized a free online writer’s conference this weekend.

You can register for free, as well as learn more about the panels at this website.

See you online!

Roll for Initiative… at a distance

I’ve been compiling the various resources and freebies that people are posting daily on the Interwebs as ways to combat the coronavirus isolation.

One activity I sorely want to try in the coming weeks is delving back into some role playing games (RPGs)… and, in fact, it’s possible that might be an activity to do with my kids.

So Paul Darvasi’s article for KQED is a treasure trove of ideas about how one can use RPGs for educating people (and honestly, just being a better gamemaster).

In addition, since we’re now in stay-at-home mode, Charlie Hall has a great article on Polygon about how to run your RPG online. I’ve used Roll20 before, but I’m thinking trying straight video may be easier to just jump in. I just need to work on the descriptions.

Plato, Plumbers, and Lifelong Learning

My brothers and I definitely benefited from parents who instilled an enjoyment of learning in us. We like finding out more about something for its own sake, delving deeper, and, yes, we all still get a little sad thinking about what happened to the Library of Alexandria some centuries ago.

Now we’re trying to figure out what our parents did specifically, because we have kids of our own. Kids who need to read, write, or work on ‘rithmetic.

And in the Internet-age of easily compartmentalized information, that seems all the more important, both for our kids and people in general. What are we doing as a society to encourage more curious citizens (we seem to know how to encourage consumers pretty well).

All of these are things that came to mind while reading Scott Samuelson’s piece in The Atlantic. The question he asks at the end is well worth considering.